Anthropology Stories

A Social Anthropology blog of art, stories, history,ideas,culture, explorations, and information about internships, field schools, etc.

pomegranateandivy:

“The story about where volcanoes come from” 

This is the most beautiful story I’ve ever read about the creation of volcanoes 

(via kraftastrophe)

just-babs asked: It's disturbing that so many of the insensitive, ignorant, bigoted, and callous quotes about the poor, homeless, and oppressed are coming from sociology majors. They're clearly not learning anything if they still continue saying the abhorrent stuff they say

shitrichcollegekidssay:

basically!

or the colleges they go to treat them like customers that need to be kept happy

but it’s probably a mix of both, and the insulation that comes from being up on the ivory tower

Or it’s that they’ve had privileged, sheltered lives where they’ve never interacted with anyone outside their socioeconomic group.

It also depends on where they live/go to school and their exposure to these groups of people.

In a second year soc class I was in no one in my class knew what the welfare amount was (in B.C Canada).I think some douchey little 19 yr old made a comment that people on welfare “had it easy and have more than enough money to live off of”.  

Many kids just don’t know and have never been taught (by their parents) to think about others.

It’s $550/month btw and that includes rent. 

Munday

blog-for-rpers:

❤ - Tumblr user I would date
❣ - An unpopular opinion I have
⋆ - My personal blog url
❧ - Other websites I’m on
✗ - Skype
☒ - My nickname
☑ - My real name
♞ - My age
✾ - TV serie I love
◎ - Relationship status
☄ - My opinion of you
✾ - TV series I love
◎ - Relationship status
❂ - Post a picture of myself
☄ - My opinion of you

(via surethattotallyhappened)

Can You Change Your Race? 'Ethnic Plastic Surgery' Raises Big Questions

livingwithfriendsinmyhead:

We told you(s) all that our valiant effort to promote the normalization of racial/ethnic transitioning would prevail in a successful manner!

We hate to say “We told you(s) so,” but we told you(s) so. 

backin15minutes asked: Hi, I have a question about cultural appropriation. I recently bought a ukulele for my birthday, and I really wanted to name it (I like naming my instruments!). I thought it might be appropriate to give it a Hawaiin name or word. Would that be disrespectful to that culture? I really don't want to offend anyone, I just want a pretty name for my new ukulele. Thanks!

I think it would be fine and I’ve asked several ppl what they thought and think it’s fine. A Hawaiian name seems fitting.

Yes?No?

When I post things I don’t always agree with what is in a post. Many times I totally disagree with what’s being posted but I still think the information, thoughts, ideas, conversations, etc is important for us to think about, debate, question, etc.

Perspective is important.

jtotheizzoe:

Are Male and Female Brains Different?

This awesome new video from BrainCraft takes a look at the old adage “Men are from Mars, women are from Venus” through the lens of modern brain science. Sure, there’s lots of biological differences between people who identify as male, female, or neither… but in terms of our brains, do any of them really matter? Or are we just trying to mold science into what society already believes is true?

Watch and learn.

neruk0 asked: Why do you hate the discovering of the world so much? People who share culture, people who learn things from different countries, people who enrich themselves and others around them? Because that's what this whole "culture appropriation" is about, it's as if all you really want is to build giant barriers between each countries so that their cultures just stay in one place, so that there wouldn't be any interactions between countries, everyone stays confined,no one can enjoy the world. Seems fun

whitepeoplesaidwhat:

I’m in fucking Bali right now and I ain’t appropriating SHIT because I know my goddamn place here.

So shoo fly don’t bother me.

-Holly

aabany-group:

A story that has never been told, Chinese American Exclusion/Inclusion illustrates the often overlooked Chinese experience at the heart of American history. The New York Historical Society’s landmark exhibition will be on from September 26th until May 2015. This exhibit highlights the lives, achievements, culture, struggles, and diversity of Chinese Americans from the 18th century to today.
Please help the New York Historical Society in conveying the richness of our lived experiences. The Many Faces page on the exhibit’s website offers an opportunity for Chinese Americans to tell their own stories. The New York Chinese-American community is invited to share a story and photo. Submissions may be featured in the exhibit or online. Click here to share your story. 

aabany-group:

A story that has never been told, Chinese American Exclusion/Inclusion illustrates the often overlooked Chinese experience at the heart of American history. The New York Historical Society’s landmark exhibition will be on from September 26th until May 2015. This exhibit highlights the lives, achievements, culture, struggles, and diversity of Chinese Americans from the 18th century to today.

Please help the New York Historical Society in conveying the richness of our lived experiences. The Many Faces page on the exhibit’s website offers an opportunity for Chinese Americans to tell their own stories. The New York Chinese-American community is invited to share a story and photo. Submissions may be featured in the exhibit or online. Click here to share your story. 

(via thisiswhiteprivilege)

ourloveisamystery asked: I have always had a deep love and appreciation for the cultural and religious connection to mehndi designs. I was wondering if the usage of these designs would be considered cultural appropriation to use the designs during special occasions even though I am not of Hindu religion? Or would it be seen as cultural appreciation?

whitepeoplesaidwhat:

Appropriation.

😓

-Holly

What do gender & power have in common? They are not the properties of individuals — possessions that one has or doesn’t have — but rather, the properties of social life. An isolated human being cannot have power. An isolated human being cannot have a gender.

—Sociologist Michael Kimmel, The Gendered Society {2011} (via socio-logic)

(Source: twoheadedgorilla, via amazinganthropologicalamanda)

sagansense:

You’re looking at a 20th century bronze bust of Charles Darwin, which is displayed in the Rotunda Gallery of Washington DC’s National Academy of Sciences Building.

On the walls beyond, however, you’ll notice something seemingly abstract, but very familiar. Darwin’s first “Tree of Life” as a foreground basis for the canvases displaying select pages from Darwin’s greatest literature, ‘On The Origin of Species’.

The exhibition - installed in 2009 - is explained more thoroughly by Jackie Grom of the AAAS (American Association For The Advancement Of Science):

The unusual concept was developed by Tim Rollins and his collaborators, “learning disabled” students of the South Bronx who call themselves K.O.S. (Kids of Survival). Since the 1980s, Rollins has engaged his students’ minds, and hands, encouraging them to draw or paint pictures in books of classic literature that the students were reading. Several of the students who started with Rollins in the beginning of K.O.S, when they were 11 to 13 years old, are still taking part in the program today as adults.

In 2007, Rollins and the K.O.S. were approached by J. D. Talasek, the director of cultural programs at the National Academy of Sciences, to create a piece based on Darwin’s seminal work. “We’ve been trying to tackle Darwin for years and years," says Rollins, but "[Talasek] really put a fire under us.

The group, which consists primarily of eight artists ranging from ages 16 to 37, plus Rollins, 53, pulled together any information they could find on Darwin. “It was a big scavenger hunt in terms of information," Rollins says. They read through On the Origin of Species, pondered the "poetic passages," watched documentaries on Darwin, gathered magazine articles, and researched existing art that was inspired by the text.

The group decided early on that they did not want a traditional image of Darwin and evolution; they wanted something intuitive, not literal. “We wanted to see what evolution looked like,” says Rollins. Visually capturing evolution proved a real “struggle,” the artist says. The group abandoned two concepts, before pursuing the one that went on display at the National Academy of Sciences on 2 February 2009.

Their “eureka moment," Rollins says, was inspired by the original “Tree of Life” that Darwin sketched on a notebook page, and the statement that accompanies the image: "I think." They scanned Darwin’s rough diagram and decided to extend and expand it over the canvas—to "replicate the process of natural selection, the randomness, the excitement of life," Rollins says.

Darwin’s words, faintly visible beneath a thin veneer of white matte acrylic, are covered by a branching network of black ink made from beetle shells and carbon. A key decision, Rollins says, was to have the origin of this network remain hidden, with just a line to it extending off canvas, from above. This tries to capture the “amazing mystery of creation," according to Rollins.

The artist notes that people viewing the work often don’t see the connection of the branching pattern to Darwin, with some asking ‘Where’s the fish, the birds, the finches?’ But Rollins says he and the K.O.S. wanted to capture Darwin’s “intense free inquiry … the love of questioning where things come from, where things are, and where they are going." "I definitely think that you feel that flow in the painting," he says.

I had the privilege of seeing this incredibly beautiful installation up close, and it absolutely captures the essence of Darwin’s creative flow. You can’t be anything but inspired when standing in the middle of that exhibit, accompanied by that bronze statue of a man to whom we still continue to learn so much…

Freedom of thought is best promoted by the gradual illumination of [our] minds which follows from the advance of science.

― Charles Darwin

…stay curious.

(Source: cpnas.org)